David J. Kearney

May 31, 2012

Project Marathon: The Road to 26.2 – My First Marathon

Filed under: Project Management,Running — David J. Kearney @ 12:30 pm

After coming off of and recovering from my first half-marathon in Pittsburgh (http://www.pittsburghmarathon.com/) on May 6, 2012, I have decided to pursue the full Columbus Marathon (http://www.columbusmarathon.com/) on October 21, 2012. I put together the following plan based on research, interviews, and experience from my first half marathon. Feel free to help me fill-in the blanks and critique The Plan, so I can be sure to avoid injury, train properly, and finish the marathon.

Project Marathon – The Road to 26.2

Goal of Project Plan: The goal of the Project Marathon – The Road to 26.2 project plan is to; 1) document plan that consists of various research, 2) develop baseline to understand process of training & running for a marathon, 3) train to be able to achieve completion of marathon 4) track progress and variations based on plan, 5) run the Columbus Marathon, and 6) document lessons learned and tips for future marathons and for others attempting a first marathon.

As everyone knows that has ever managed a project; a project is the application of knowledge, skills, tools, & techniques to project activities to meet the project requirements. Running a marathon seems to be the perfect fit to project management. A marathon, especially a first, is a fairly big undertaking and is a perfect project that needs managed. It is all about planning before you do. The Plan will be progressively elaborated throughout.

Marathon Areas of Focus:

Goal/Requirements: Complete Columbus Marathon/First Marathon within 5 hours 15 minutes

Stakeholders: Jenn, Caleb, Family, Employer(s), Me

Why: (all projects need a why)

  • Show what I am made of
  • Better understand what I am capable of
  • Set example for Caleb
  • Focus on a non-career and non-academic goal
  • Fitness
  • Mental Discipline
  • Physical Discipline
  • Tired of hearing my own excuses

Research Resources:

Injury Possibilities & Remedies:

  • Research summary – WIP

Calorie Consumption:

A basic rule of thumb is that you should be taking in about 100 calories after about an hour of running and then another 100 calories every 40-45 minutes after that. You may need more depending on your size and speed, so make sure you plan to carry extra food or gels. If you’re feeling hungry or low on energy, you can definitely eat “off-schedule”.

Food

  • Pre-Race Breakfast
  • During Race

Liquids

  • Pre-Race Liquids
  • During Race

Pre-Race Day

  • Breakfast
  • Lunch
  • Dinner

Race Day

Food/Calories Tried Around and During Training Runs:

  • G Series Pre-Game Fuel – Fruit Punch: Pre-run (10 Miles) – Seemed to be OK
  • Gu Energy – Strawberry Banana: 5 Miles in to a 10 Mile Run – Post Run Issues?
  • PowerBar – Peanut Butter: Pre-Run (1 hour prior) of a 5 Mile Run – Seemed OK
  • Water – Occasionally during 5 Mile Run – Seemed OK
  • PowerBar- Nut Naturals Trail Mix Pre-Run – Maybe a little heartburn early in run
  • GU Chomps – Watermelon – Worked Great

Stretching

  • Research summary – WIP

Shoes

  • Changed from Nike Pegasus 28 to Brooks Glycerin 9. I am currently wearing out my third pair of Nike’s, but the Brooks do seem like a better fit for me.

Post-Race Clothes

  • Research summary – WIP

Pace

  • Research summary – WIP

Question I have been asked:

1. Who are you running/training with? No one. What I love about running is the solitude. Also, if I was running with someone, I might have a tendency to hold my running partner(s) back or be held back a bit during training.

2. What is your current diet? How did you lose weight and how much have you lost?  I am closely tracking and watching my food intake.  I use Calorie Count (iPhone App for tracking nad webapp for reporting/printing.  I am eating a lot of salads (sometime breakfast, lunch, & dinner), cliff bars, & fruit.  I lost about 30+ pounds in 4 months. 

3.  How can you run a full marathon?  (my son asked me this)  Because I think I can.  I am following the instruction that others have found they can finish with and I am going to try.

4.  Are you using anything to track your runs?  I use a Garmin Forerunner 305 for nearly all of my runs.   Garmin has an OK desktop app and a really nice webapp where I can catalog and  track all of my runs.  Very occasionally I use my iPhone in conjunction with the Garmin app if I don’t have my Garmin device available. I really don’t like bulk around my arm or anywhere else for that matter…I tried that with my iPod classic, but moved to a iPod nano G6 since it is much, much smaller. Maybe I just  haven’t gotten use to what I think of as a bulky iPhone, as I know many folks are OK with the use of iPhones for their running tracking device, but  I am not quite there, yet. I will be surprised what I do when my Garmin dies.  Alo, I am not thrilled with the iPhone battery life over a multi-hour run.

5.  When do you find time to train?  When do you run?  I have always been a early morning person, either for work or acedemic pursuits, so I generally get up around 4:30 AM (give or take 15 minutes) and get going.  During the work week I drive into the office and run the city then shower (the building I am in has a gym) and at my desk around 7:00.  There is not much different about my schedule here other than I am running, not studying or working, during this time.  On the weekends I use Sunday as my long-run day around the area I live.  Again, usually up around 4:30 and then usually back home around 8:00 – 8:30.  Typically, my rest days are Saturday and Monday.  I am considering adding another rest day to my schedule.

Training Schedule:

These two schedules; 1) I developed with research, and 2) one tweaked by a friend and muli-marathoner, Tony Chan. These training schedules will represent the framework that I will follow to prepare, but will remain flexible.

Training Schedule 1:

Columbus Training Schedule                    
21-Oct-12                    
  Week Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Total  
June 3 – June 30                    
  1 9 0 5 5 5 5 0 29  
  2 10 0 5 5 5 5 0 30  
  3 7 0 5 5 5 5 0 27  
  4 6 0 5 5 5 5 0 26  
July 1 – Aug 4                    
  5 5 0 5 5 5 5 0 25  
  6 5 0 5 4 4 3 0 21  
  7 6 0 5 4 4 4 0 23  
  8 7 0 3 5 4 3 0 22  
  9 8 0 5 4 3 3 0 23  
August 5 – Sept 1                    
  10 10 0 3 4 4 3 0 24  
  11 11 0 4 5 3 3 0 26  
  12 12 0 4 6 3 3 0 28  
  13 14 0 6 4 3 3 0 30  
Sept 2 – 29                    
  14 16 0 4 7 3 2 0 32  
  15 16 0 5 6 6 3 0 36  
  16 17 0 5 5 5 3 0 35  
  17 18 0 5 8 5 3 0 39  
Sept 30 – Oct 21                    
  18 20 0 5 6 7   0 38  
  19 9 0 5 8 5 0 0 27  
  20 8 0 3 5 3 0 0 19  
  21 26.2                

Training Schedule 2:

Columbus Training Schedule                    
21-Oct-12                    
  Week Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Total  
June 3 – June 30                    
  1 6 0 2 4 2 4 0 18  
  2 7 0 2 4 2 4 0 19  
  3 8 0 2 4 2 4 0 20  
  4 9 0 2 4 2 4 0 21  
July 1 – Aug 4                    
  5 10 0 2 4 2 4 0 22  
  6 10 0 2 5 2 4 0 23  
  7 10 0 2 5 2 5 0 24  
  8 12 0 2 5 2 5 0 26  
  9 12 0 2 6 2 6 0 28  
August 5 – Sept 1                    
  10 13 0 3 6 2 6 0 30  
  11 14 0 3 6 3 6 0 32  
  12 15 0 3 7 3 6 0 34  
  13 16 0 3 7 3 7 0 36  
Sept 2 – 29                    
  14 16 0 3 8 3 8 0 38  
  15 18 0 3 8 3 8 0 40  
  16 16 0 4 8 4 8 0 40  
  17 20 0 4 8 4 8 0 44  
Sept 30 – Oct 21                    
  18 21 0 4 6 4 6 0 41  
  19 12 0 3 6 5 6 0 32  
  20 8 0 3 4 3 0 0 18  
  21 26.2                

Recommendations to Consider – Provided to me by other marathoners:

  • “For your long run schedule, I might suggest a slightly different plan….”2 ups and a down”…do distance x for week 1, x+2 for week 2, and x-2 (or x minus more) for the third week. Then, for the next 3-week cycle, do it again where x=previous “week2” distance. Your body and mind need a little recovery time, especially on your first training cycle. “
  • “After running numerous half-marathos (age 60 PR of 1:48) I too have taken on training for my 1st full marathon, the San Antonio Rock & Roll Marathon on Nov. 11. A younger marathon veteran friend of mine suggested I look into the Jeff Galloway marathon training ( http://www.jeffgalloway.com/training/marathon.html ). I’ve been at it for several weeks now and found that his method truly does work. 17 mile Saturday runs of 3+ hours are easily doable even in this Texas heat. and the recovery time is minimal,even at age 62. If your current training method doesn’t p[roduce the results you seek you may want to explore Jeff Galloway’s. Good luck and happy trails! “

 

http://results.active.com/events/dick-s-sporting-goods-pittsburgh-marathon-2012/half-marathon/david-kearney

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May 4, 2012

Review: ‘Digital Forensics for Legal Professionals’ Is Essential Reading

Filed under: e-Discovery,Litigation Support,Project Management,Technology — David J. Kearney @ 10:46 am

Authors Larry and Lars Daniel have assembled a nearly perfect book: Digital Forensics for Legal Professionals: Understanding Digital Evidence From the Warrant to the Courtroom is a reference manual, instruction guide, and a best practices and lessons-learned archive that’s essential reading for legal professionals working with digital evidence.

The topics covered in the book are designed efficiently and easily absorbed, with technical and legal concepts articulated by real-world examples. Technical concepts, such as HASH values, metadata, file carving, and thumbnail caches are simplified. Laws and acts, including civil and criminal proceedings, the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006, rules of discovery, and orders are explained clearly enough for non-lawyers to understand. Both authors have many years of practical hands-on experience, relevant certifications, and have spoken at dozens of events on the topic of forensics. By all accounts, the authors are experts and have been able to share their knowledge simply and articulately, while presenting forensic evidence, technical, and legal concepts eloquently.

The Daniels start chapters with an introduction to each topic, explain the topics with short but informational content supplemented with examples and graphics, and close with a recap of what was covered. The book is arranged into four sections: “What is Digital Forensics”; “Experts”; “Motions and Discovery”; and “Common Types of Digital Evidence.” The four sections and the chapters contained within focus on areas that everyone working with digital evidence should be familiar.

They also act as an easy reference for looking up specific topics, such as working with and qualifying digital forensics experts within various disciplines; discovery motions and how to request discovery from third parties that store data, including the Stored Communications Act, Electronic Communication Privacy Act, HIPAA, and the Fourth Amendment; and the countless types of digital evidence and the preservation and acquisition of evidence from desktop computers to GPS devices to gaming devices to financial systems — and everything else in-between.

Digital Forensics is the ideal companion for lawyers, paralegals, and technology and business professionals working with potential digital evidence on a day-to-day basis or within civil or criminal proceedings. More than just a good starting point or an introduction, the book is deliberate when explaining the concepts, including typical practices like usage of Faraday Bags for evidence that might be altered via wireless communications when powered on, video recording any manual examination process without any stops during video capture, collecting data from systems that should not or cannot be powered off or on without risk of spoliation during acquisition, assembling detailed documentation of acquisition activities, or how to approach the collection of digital evidence in the manner of a police crime scene investigation.

Digital evidence exists all around us on countless devices being every generated manually and automatically every day, so having a book like Digital Forensics as a reference is invaluable.

Lawyers can benefit by having a resource that explains the acquisition of evidence and the ways to request this information from various sources, provides an understanding of the technical concepts and practices of forensics, and offers some of the cautions of working with digital evidence. Paralegals, technology professionals, and e-discovery experts can benefit by being able to better assist attorneys, corporations, law firms, and clients to manage what can be a very intimidating process. Accidental or purposeful mishandling of evidence can lead to varying degrees of sanctions, including a default judgment, so knowledge of how to handle digital evidence is crucial.

There is so much valuable information contained within this book that I found it was difficult to put down once I started it. Its readability is excellent and I could directly and immediately apply the book’s lessons to my day-to-day work within technology, project management, and electronic discovery. As I was finishing the final two chapters, an attorney came to me with a case project that included a digital evidence acquisition with multiple cell phones and, lo-and-behold, I was equipped to speak to the process of the data acquisition and intelligently begin the project due to this book.

Digital evidence is here to stay and the management of that evidence has been made easier to understand with Digital Forensics for Legal Professionals.

Title: Digital Forensics for Legal Professionals

Authors: Larry Daniel, Lars Daniel

Publisher:Syngence/Elsevier 2011

David J. Kearney is director of technology services at Cohen & Grigsby in Pittsburgh. Email: dkearney@cohenlaw.com.

Copyright 2012. ALM Media Properties, LLC. All rights reserved.

Reprinted with permission from Law Technology News. Further Duplication prohibited.

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